(Golden Globes/Twitter)

(Golden Globes/Twitter)

Snubs, surprises and a Satanic shout-out? Key Globes moments

The 2019 Globes were much less overtly activist or political than previous years

It was a moment when everyone — absolutely everyone — expected to see an ebullient Lady Gaga climbing to the stage in her dramatic periwinkle gown. Instead, a visibly stunned Glenn Close got the Golden Globe. But her deeply personal speech about women’s need for fulfilment outside the family soon had the crowd on its feet, providing the emotional highpoint of the night.

A year ago the Golden Globes were all about #MeToo and #Time’sUp. A year earlier, it was all about politics. The 2019 Globes were much less overtly activist or political, but speeches by Close as well as co-host Sandra Oh and actress Regina King kept issues of equality and diversity alive in a more personal way.

Oh, and of course there was the usual Globes craziness: “Bohemian Rhapsody” as best drama? The groundbreaking “Black Panther” snubbed? And nothing for Bradley Cooper — really?

Some notable moments of the night, in no particular order:

THE POWER OF NICE

Taking the stage for their opening monologue, co-hosts Oh and Andy Samberg had an explanation for why they’d been chosen: they were “the only two people left in Hollywood who haven’t gotten in trouble for saying something offensive.” Then they riffed on that by pretending to roast people by actually saying nice things. (“Bradley Cooper: You are hot!” “Jeff Bridges, I wish you were my Dad!”) The bit didn’t get uproarious laughs but was pleasantly, well, pleasant.

BUT … SATAN?

Was this the first time Satan got a shout-out in an acceptance speech? If so, we have Christian Bale to thank. The Welsh actor was accepting his award for “Vice,” in which he made a stunning transformation into a chubby and bald Dick Cheney. After thanking castmates and director Adam McKay, he extended a “thank you to Satan for giving me inspiration for this role.” He also mused that he might try to play Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell next.

A DECENT NIGHT FOR ‘OLD MEN’

“Mary Poppins Returns” may have gone home empty-handed, but 93-year-old Dick Van Dyke, who has a wonderfully spry cameo in the film, got a big ovation when he came out with Emily Blunt, who plays Mary. And Michael Douglas, winning his Globe for “The Kominsky Method,” exulted that “alte kakers rule!,” using the Yiddish term for “old man.” The 74-year-old actor also dedicated his award to his 102-year-old father, Kirk Douglas.

A TIME’S UP CHALLENGE

A year after the Globes carpet was a sea of shimmering black, worn in solidarity with .MeToo and Time’s Up, colorful gowns were back — though some attendees wore ribbons saying “TIMESUPx2,” marking the second year of the gender equality movement. On the carpet was actress Alyssa Milano, who sent the tweet that made .MeToo go viral she noted that in the past year, a “really wonderful sisterhood has formed.” It was actress Regina King of “If Beale Street Could Talk,” though, who made the most memorable reference to Time’s Up, resisting the orchestra’s efforts to play her off, and vowing that in the next two years, her producing projects would be staffed by 50 per cent women. She challenged those in other industries to do the same.

OH TURNS EMOTIONAL

After an opener with Samberg full of zingers, Oh suddenly became emotional, explaining that she’d agreed to host the show — and overcome the fear — to celebrate the diversity of the nominated casts. “I wanted to be here to look out on this audience and witness this moment of change,” she said. “I am not fooling myself. Next year could be different. But right now this moment is real.” Soon after, Oh herself won best actress in a TV drama for “Killing Eve,” and thanked her parents, movingly, in Korean.

UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL

When Close won best actress in a movie drama, she seemed as shocked as everyone else. But then the 71-year-old actress made a heartfelt connection between her role in “The Wife,” in which she plays a wife who sublimates her own ambitions to those of her husband in a stunning way, and her own life. “I am thinking of my mom who really sublimated herself to my father her whole life,” Close said. She added that women are expected to be nurturers, “but we have to find personal fulfilment. We have to follow our dreams. We have to say, I can do that and I should be allowed to do that.” The crowd rose to cheer.

GAGA’S WIN

At least Lady Gaga didn’t go home empty-handed: She won as a co-writer for best song, “Shallow,” which she performs with Cooper in “A Star is Born.” In her speech, she too referred to the challenges women face, not in the film industry but in music. “As a woman in music it is really hard to be taken seriously as musician and as a songwriter,” she said, adding that her co-writers “lifted me up, they supported me.” Gaga wrote the song with Mark Ronson, Anthony Rossomando and Andrew Wyatt.

COLMAN’S ‘FAVOURITE’ THING

Not every speech had a serious tone to it. Olivia Colman, who won best actress in a musical or comedy for ‘The Favourite,’ in which she plays a comically troubled queen, told the crowd: “I would like to tell you how much this film meant to me, but I can’t think of it.” She also noted that one of her “favourite” things about making the film was that she “ate constantly through the film.”

WHAT WAS THAT, DUDE?

We’re not really sure what he was saying in his rambling speech accepting the Cecil B. DeMille Award — especially when he started talking about ships, and saying, “Tag, you’re it!” But hey, Jeff Bridges is best known as a stoner icon in “The Big Lebowski,” so it was sort of apt that he wasn’t so easy to follow. It was simply fun to experience his joy it’s just too bad he wasn’t wearing a bathrobe. Harrison Ford, coming next, was even crustier than usual. “Nobody told me I had to follow Jeff Bridges,” he said.

WOW, SHE KNOWS ME?

It was a sweet red carpet moment as Elisabeth Moss, star of “The Handmaid’s Tale,” discovered that Taylor Swift was a fan. Ryan Seacrest presented her with a video from Swift, gushing about the show. “I can’t believe she even knows who I am!!” Moss exulted, showing that stars can sometimes be exactly like us.

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

/ Kevin Mills Photo
Hundreds participate in solidarity parade for transgender student who was bullied

Cars, horses and even planes passed by the Mission waterfront to show support

Kent Search and Rescue sent down three rescuers
UPDATE: Two people involved in ATV rollover 100 feet down ravine in Harrison, at least one injured

Incident happened shortly before 5 p.m. on Harrison East Forest Service Road

An amethyst rock was stolen from Swinstones Granite Shop’s showroom in Chilliwack on Yale Rd. West, and they are hoping it will be spotted and returned. They discovered their window smashed and the purple rock stolen on the morning of Jan. 17, 2020. Here a portion of it is pictured to the right. (Submitted image)
Amethyst stolen from Chilliwack stone shop’s showroom

Window smashed at business where purple rock has been on display for nearly 16 years

sdf
Another Mission student arrested for assault, in 2nd case of in-school violence this week

RCMP notified of local Instagram page with videos (now deleted) showing student assaults, bullying

Two people on a paddleboard take advantage of a calm Cultus Lake on Friday, Jan. 15, 2021. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
WEATHER: Forecast calls for lots of sun in Fraser Valley this coming week

Most of next seven days will be sunny for eastern Fraser Valley, according to Environment Canada

A scene from “Canada and the Gulf War: In their own words,” a video by The Memory Project, a program of Historica Canada, is shown in this undated illustration. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO - Historica Canada
New video marks Canada’s contributions to first Gulf War on 30th anniversary

Veterans Affairs Canada says around 4,500 Canadian military personnel served during the war

A 17-year-old snowmobiler used his backcountry survival sense in preparation to spend the night on the mountain near 100 Mile House Saturday, Jan. 16, 2021 after getting lost. (South Cariboo Search and Rescue Facebook photo)
Teen praised for backcountry survival skills after getting lost in B.C.’s Cariboo mountains

“This young man did everything right after things went wrong.”

Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole holds a press conference on Parliament Hill, in Ottawa on December 10, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
No place for ‘far right’ in Conservative Party, Erin O’Toole says

O’Toole condemned the Capitol attack as ‘horrifying’ and sought to distance himself and the Tories from Trumpism

A passer by walks in High Park, in Toronto, Thursday, Jan. 14, 2021. This workweek will kick off with what’s fabled to be the most depressing day of the year, during one of the darkest eras in recent history. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young
‘Blue Monday’ getting you down? Exercise may be the cure, say experts

Many jurisdictions are tightening restrictions to curb soaring COVID-19 case counts

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good
Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Pindie Dhaliwal, one of the organizers for the Surrey Challo protest for Indian farmers. She says organizers were told by Surrey RCMP that the event was not allowed due to COVID-19. Organizers ended up moving the protest to Strawberry Hill at the last minute. (Photo: Lauren Collins)
Indian farmers rally moves as organizers say Surrey RCMP told them they couldn’t gather

Protest originally planned in Cloverdale, moved to Strawberry Hill

A health-care worker prepares a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at a UHN COVID-19 vaccine clinic in Toronto on Thursday, January 7, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
COVID-19: Provinces work on revised plans as Pfizer-BioNTech shipments to slow down

Anita Anand said she understands and shares Canadians’ concerns about the drug company’s decision

Tourists take photographs outside the British Columbia Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Friday August 26, 2011. A coalition of British Columbia tourism industry groups is urging the provincial government to not pursue plans to ban domestic travel to fight the spread of COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
B.C. travel ban will harm struggling tourism sector, says industry coalition

B.C. government would have to show evidence a travel ban is necessary

Most Read