Parenting program promotes the positives

Benefits of specialized program can be dramatic and long lasting

  • Jul. 18, 2013 6:00 p.m.

The Triple P – Positive Parenting Program is one of the world’s most effective parenting programs.

It is one of only a few based on evidence from ongoing scientific research. Developed by clinical psychologist Professor Matt Sanders and his colleagues at Australia’s University of Queensland, Triple P has been shown to work with hundreds of thousands of families through ongoing research over 30 years. More than 250 international trials, studies and published papers have shown it works across cultures, socio-economic groups and in many different family structures.

Triple P is designed to give parents the skills they need to raise confident, healthy children and teenagers and to build stronger family relationships. Triple P doesn’t tell people how to parent. Rather, it gives parents simple and practical strategies they can adapt to suit their own values, beliefs and needs. The benefits can be dramatic and long-lasting.

“Children who grow up with positive parenting are more likely to develop the skills they need to do well at school, build friendships, and feel good about themselves,” says Professor Sanders.

“They are also much less likely to develop behaviourial or emotional problems when they get older. Similarly, parents who use positive parenting skills feel more confident and competent about managing day-to-day family life. They are also less stressed, less depressed and have less conflict with their partners over parenting issues.”

Triple P is distinctive in that it is not a ‘one-size-fits-all’ course.  Rather, it is a system that offers increasing levels of support to meet parents’ different needs.   Parents can choose anything from one-off public seminars or self-help books and DVDs to more intensive group courses or individual counseling sessions. Triple P is now also available online, adding further flexibility and convenience for parents.

“Some parents may just need a light-touch of Triple P, a few ideas to help them set up a better bedtime routine or manage occasional disobedience,” says Professor Sanders. “But others may be in crisis and need greater support. So Triple P is based on the idea that we give parents just the right amount of help they need – enough, but not too much.”

Triple P has also been designed as a population-based health approach to parenting – typically implemented by government bodies or NGOs (non-government organizations) across regions or countries with the aim of reaching as many people as possible. It is often delivered through health, families or education departments.

Practitioners come from a range of professions and include doctors, nurses, psychologists, counsellors, teachers, teacher’s aides, police officers, clergy, social workers and health support workers. The concept, once again, is to provide easy access, support and choice for parents.

“Parenting is the most difficult job any of us will ever do in our lives, but it’s also the one we’re least prepared for,” says Professor Sanders.

“By making parenting information more widely available we’re increasing the likelihood that parents will accept or seek out help.  Offering Triple P is like immunizing the community. You prepare parents, make families healthier and prevent problems before they happen. ”

Triple P is now used in more than 20 countries including the USA, England, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Belgium, Japan, Iran, Hong Kong, Singapore, the Netherlands, Scotland, Ireland, Wales, Germany, Curacao, Switzerland, Austria, Romania and Sweden. It has been translated into 17 languages to meet specific country requirements.

Triple P has won numerous international awards, including the Australian Heads of Government National Violence Prevention Award and Professor Sanders has been a consultant to the World Health Organization and the Council of Europe and to governments in countries including the UK, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Switzerland, Japan and Iran.

A number of specialist Triple P programs have also been developed. These include Stepping Stones Triple P (for parents of children with a disability), Family Transitions Triple P (for parents going through divorce or separation), Lifestyle Triple P (preventing obesity in children) and Indigenous Triple P (for Indigenous families).

For more information, phone  LaRee Russell at 604-796-0313 or email familyplace1@agassizcs.ca.

 

 

Just Posted

EDITORIAL: Post-grad years are your time

Editor Grace Kennedy shares a few words for this year’s high school grads

PHOTOS: Sasquatch Days about ‘being proud of being Sts’ailes’

The joint event between Harrison and Sts’ailes returned to the village for its eighth year

‘This was my baby’: Music teacher to retire after 29 years at Kent Elementary

Brenda Di Rezze will be saying goodbye to her music room at the end of this school year

LETTER: Harrison needs trees, not a new parking lot

Harrison resident Janne Perrin reminds council that trees are important too

UPDATE: Two young Chilliwack men facing at least five years jail for armed robbery

Darius Commodore and Jaimal Mclaren face 13 charges in Mission/Agassiz incident involving police dog

VIDEO: Reading splashes into Agassiz’s Ferny Coombe Pool

The Agassiz Library held its annual Reading in the Pool event Friday, June 14

B.C. VIEWS: When farmland protection doesn’t protect farmers

Secondary residences aren’t mansions, families tell Lana Popham

Bombers down B.C. Lions 33-23 in season opener

Former Lion Andrew Harris leads Winnipeg with 148 rushing yards

Northern B.C. family remembers murdered Indigenous woman with memorial walk

Still no closure for Ramona Wilson’s family 25 years later

Pride flag taken down by Township of Langley

Woman said she was told it was removed from her front yard because of a complaint

B.C. university to offer mentorship program for former youth in care

Students using the provincial tuition waiver program will soon be able to form a community at KPU

Cyclists competing in one of the toughest bike races on the planet pass through Fernie

Divide riders looking strong as they finish first leg of 4160 km race

You might not know these B.C. records are public

Hired a lawyer to file a civil claim? Those are published online

B.C. bus driver loses case to get job back after texting while driving full bus

An arbitator ruled that Tim Wesman’s phone usage was a “a reckless disregard for public safety”

Most Read