HARRISON ELECTION

Q & A with Harrison Hot Springs mayoral candidates

Village mayor-hopefuls answer the Observer’s questions

Questions for Harrison Hot Springs mayoral candidates:

1. What two qualities make you suited for a leadership role?

2. What is the biggest challenge facing Harrison Hot Springs and how do you plan to address it?

3. Give two concrete examples of how you will make decisions that reflect the will of your community.

4. Do you see residential and commercial development as a benefit to the community? Why or why not?

5. Where do you stand on the quarry proposal, set to be developed close to Harrison?

John Allen

JOHN ALLEN

1. Extensive good experience forming and leading many local, regional and provincial organizations and businesses. Excellent chairing skills, ie :- Running good meetings, getting the best out of all participants, providing visionary ideas, sorting out complex issues, finding good solutions to problems. I listen carefully and assess each comment.

2. Morale is low. People are discouraged and angry at what is happening to our village. They can’t trust the Village or the OCP and zoning bylaws anymore. I will take back control of Harrison from the developers and restore confidence in the rule of law for an orderly, well-planned future. This will require bringing back good plannings and restoring proper public input by Harrisonians.

3. The “will of the community” is properly expressed in our bylaws, like the OCP. These have been ignored and the peoples’ will has been disrespected. I will respect the will of the people by returning to the proper application of our bylaws. Secondly, I will initiate real consultation and will welcome public input rather than shut the public out, as happens now. No more ridiculous time limits at public hearings. No more “agenda items only” during formal question period and a new, pre-meeting question period added.

4. Of course it’s beneficial. Growth is necessary as it provides the opportunity to build Harrison into a better community. But only if it’s done properly and in accordance with our own orderly growth plan. That plan, ( the OCP and zoning bylaws) has been gutted . We’ve lost our parks , trees and greenspace which were essential elements of a liveable community. We’ll lose the Harrison Forest Park, too, if this destruction is allowed to continue.

5. I’m strongly opposed. If Timbro proceeds with it, I will try to blacklist them. No more multi-million dollar Village contracts for the quarry men. That potential financial loss should stop the quarry.

Related: Former mayor John Allen challenging Facio in Harrison election

Leo Facio

LEO FACIO

1.Vision with meaning, leadership understood as the competitive edge. Priorities with action, and community with connectedness.

2. Communication collaboration cooperation.The community feels a sense of pride and optimistic about the future of there community.

3. Community members are involved in significant community decisions.

4. Development can be a benefit to the community, we need to be sustainable , more services , housing needs, recreation and culture. Maintain a reasonable tax base

5. Myself and council sent the first letter to the mines inspector, opposing the quarry application, and to the Minister. I have been very prominent with the committee arranging meetings with all levels of Government and First Nations. Myself with Hwys Minister, MLA and inspector of mines, discussing our concerns of the quarry in Victoria. We continue to lobby.

Related: Facio seeks re-election in Harrison Hot Springs



nina.grossman@ahobserver.com

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