Sexual offender Taylor Dueck of Abbotsford is being released from prison on Monday after serving his full sentence for sexual assault and assault with a weapon.

Abbotsford sex offender with history of violent assaults is set for prison release

Taylor Dueck, who attacked four teen girls in 2014, has served full sentence

An Abbotsford man with a history of sexual assaults who was denied parole in 2018 because of concerns that he could cause “death or serious harm to another person” has served his full sentence and is being released from prison on Monday.

Taylor Albert Dueck, 24, has served a sentence of three years and seven months for sexual assault and assault with a weapon.

He began serving that sentence in June 2016, according to Parole Board of Canada documents.

It is not yet known in which community Dueck will reside upon his release from prison.

The parole board documents state that Dueck was responsible for the sexual assaults of four teenage girls in 2014.

The first assault was in June of that year, when Dueck went with a 14-year-old for a walk in a wooded area.

He began to strangle the girl from behind and she was able to resist, but he later enticed her to go back into the woods. He threatened to kill her if she did not comply, and he then sexually assaulted her, the parole board documents state.

ALSO READ: Gangster Jarrod Bacon denied parole after prison conflict

The next attack was in July 2014, when Dueck threatened a 16-year-old girl with a knife and sexually assaulted her.

In August 2014, he assaulted another girl during a game of hide-and-seek in a wooded area, according to the parole board documents.

The documents state that Dueck put his arm around the girl’s neck, told her to lie on the ground, and hit her in the mouth before sexually assaulting her.

He was convicted in January 2015 of sexual assault for that attack and was given a 12-month conditional sentence (house arrest) and three years’ probation, but that sentence won’t begin until his release from prison on Monday.

The fourth attack was in September 2014, when Dueck followed a girl into the bathroom of a bowling alley, put his arm around her neck, forcibly kissed her and groped her.

The manager walked in and discovered an assault had occurred. While the victim called police, the manager brought Dueck into the foyer, where he was arrested minutes later and has been in jail ever since. Dueck had painter’s tape and a knife, the documents state.

For that assault, Dueck was sentenced in July 2015 to a 15-month jail term – minus six months’ credit for time served – and three years’ probation.

The parole board documents indicate that Dueck had other allegations of sexual misbehaviour that did not result in charges, including kissing a five-year-old girl, groping a nine-year-old girl while playing hide-and-seek, and threatening to post sexually explicit photos online of a girl if she did not have sex with him.

ALSO READ: Parole board sets release rules for convicted Calgary child killer from B.C. prison

Dueck applied for parole in February 2018, but both day and full parole were denied.

In its decision, the Parole Board of Canada said Dueck was being denied because there were “reasonable grounds” to believe that he was “likely to commit an offence causing death or serious harm to another person.”

The board noted that, although Dueck had taken sex-offender and other programs in prison, he continued to minimize his offences and was resistant to talking about them nor did he have a release plan to manage his risk in the community.

They also said that his cognitive impairments – Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder – make it difficult for Dueck to control his impulses or read social cues.

A January 2018 psychological assessment concluded that Dueck was at “well above average risk level for sexual recidivism.”

Dueck again came before the parole board in August 2018, when his detention was reviewed and he was ordered to remain in prison.

“The board finds that you have demonstrated a pattern of persistent violent behaviour towards females and, while you were able to express some remorse during your hearing, you continue to have little insight into the harm you caused,” Dueck was told.

“You have a history of using threats and weapons in order to get what you want, and have a history of assaulting young women … You continue to be assessed as a high risk to re-offend.”



vhopes@abbynews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Crime

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

LETTER: A bribe at worst, dangerous at best

Min Wendel of Agassiz condemns the development push for Teacup

School board OK’s sports medicine course

Approves 2020-2021 calendar during March meeting

Honk if you’re in Harrison

Despite COVID-19 restrictions in place, flights flagrantly disregard the rules and are… Continue reading

LETTER: Shades of gray in Teacup debate

Laurens Van Vliet of Agassiz has mixed thoughts about the exclusion application

B.C. firefighters only responding to most life-threatening calls during COVID-19 pandemic

The directive comes after province spoke with paramedics, fire services, according to top doctor

Here’s how to talk to people who aren’t taking physical distancing seriously

Approach the conversation with empathy says conflict expert

Fraser Valley auto sound business starts producing face shields

Certified Auto Sound & Security is doing what it can to help frontline healthcare workers.

B.C. clears more acute hospital beds as COVID-19 case growth slows

Province holding about 40% of beds empty for peak still to come

As 500K+ apply for emergency benefit, Trudeau says aid coming for Canadians left behind

Canada Emergency Response Benefit provides $2,000 per month

UPDATE: UK PM Boris Johnson moved to intensive care after COVID-19 symptoms worse

He has been quarantined in his Downing St. residence since being diagnosed with COVID-19 on March 26

Travellers, travel agents ‘in agony’ over refund policies and customer service

Many Canadian carriers are offering customers flights rebookings or travel vouchers — but not refunds

Introverted and extroverted kids likely to react differently to COVID-19 restrictions

B.C. child psychologist says your parenting approach can’t be one-size fits all in social isolation

B.C. begins taking submissions for $2M COVID-19 research fund

Rural health, impact of shifting hospital resources among priorities

Most Read