Aquila the Serval cat has returned home in good health. Submitted

Aquila the Serval cat safely home in Fernie

After two weeks missing, Aquila the Serval cat is safely back home with her owners in Fernie.

After two weeks missing, Aquila the Serval cat has arrived safely back home with her owners in Fernie, B.C.

Look back: Leads sought in wherebouts of Serval cat

Aquila, an African Serval, disappeared from Alex Hanson’s backyard in Fernie sometime on Friday, July 13. Hanson inspected the area the night she disappeared to find a large hole deliberately cut through the deer fence which lined Aquila’s one-acre enclosure. He and his partner believe someone had deliberately tried to steal her, or set her free.

What followed was a wave of confusion and frustration, not knowing if she had been stolen, or if she had escaped and was wandering around in the surrounding woods. Hope returned when Aquila was spotted on Sunday, July 22, but Hanson was unable to get her to come home.

On Thursday, July 27, Hanson’s partner, Jaime, received the call of Aquila being spotted again, and was able to bring the cat home safely. Alex said that once Aquila recognized Jaime, she bolted over and hopped up into the car.

“We’d like to thank all those involved and are very pleased to have our fur baby back home,” said Hanson on Facebook.

“Aquila was able to successfully hunt for food but managed to avoid cougars and bears before she was found, although she did lose a few pounds.”

He added that it’s great to have her back home, but what meant the most to both him and his partner was how much people cared, and how many people were interested in what was going on.

“It wouldn’t have happened without a whole bunch of people that we don’t really know all that well, that were able to help us get her back,” said Hanson.

What next?

Despite the threat to his own security, Hanson says he’s not going to live in fear. That being said, he has invested in professional security services to make sure it doesn’t happen again.

“Aquila is, basically, part of the family,” said Hanson. “And to think that somebody came here to take her, is not Fernie.”

He explained that this event was very uncharacteristic of the small mountain town, where the rate of crime is very low.

“It’s an unfortunate situation that turned out good and we’re happy about that, but we’re not going to live in fear,” said Hanson.



editor@thefreepress.ca

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