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B.C. COVID-denier Mak Parhar died from toxic drugs, not virus: coroner

Parhar was infected with virus when he died, but it wasn’t what killed him
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Makhan “Mak” Parhar speaks at an anti-mask rally outside the Vancouver Art Gallery on Sunday, Nov. 1, 2020. Parhar died on Nov. 4, 2021 from a fatal combination of illicit drugs, according to the BC Coroners’ Service. (Flat Earth Focker/YouTube.com screenshot)

Prominent B.C. COVID-denier Makhan “Mak” Singh Parhar had the virus when he died in 2021, but it wasn’t what killed him, the BC Coroners Service says.

In a May 2022 report released to media this week, the service revealed Parhar was infected with COVID-19 when he died on Nov. 4, 2021, but that it was a combination of illicit drugs that caused him to die.

The coroners service says Parhar was found unresponsive in his New Westminster bathroom by a family member around 6:30 a.m. They called 911, but paramedics determined it was too late to try and bring the 48-year-old back to life.

When the attending coroner examined the scene, they found Parhar lying on the floor with drug paraphernalia – an uncapped syringe, burnt spoon and glass pipe – nearby. Parhar had no recent medical history with substance use or opioid agonist treatment, but later toxicology analysis found he had consumed fentanyl, cocaine and ethanol.

The coroners service says it was the level of fentanyl found in Parhar’s system that was particularly concerning. The amount of cocaine was seen as only a recreational dose, and the level of ethanol was below typical intoxication levels. The combination of the three was likely what proved fatal, the coroners service determined.

It also found Parhar’s death to be accidental.

The former North Delta yoga studio owner became well known in 2020 after refusing to follow COVID-19 public health orders when returning to Canada from a Flat Earth conference in the U.S. He was charged with three counts of violating the Quarantine Act for breaking his mandatory 14-day self-isolation period.

He tried to sue the B.C. government and New Westminster Police Department in retribution, but had his lawsuit tossed out in April 2021.

In March of 2020, Parhar had his business licence suspended by the City of Delta for continuing to run hot yoga classes during lock down. Parhar told clients COVID couldn’t survive in the heat of his studio.

READ ALSO: Former North Delta yoga studio owner charged with violating Quarantine Act

READ ALSO: Judge tosses lawsuit of B.C. COVID-denier who broke quarantine after Flat Earth conference


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About the Author: Jane Skrypnek

I'm a provincial reporter for Black Press Media.
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