A copy of HSS’s new dress code (Facebook photo)

B.C. high school withdraws notices for temporary dress code

Parents previously told the Interior News they felt there was inadequate consultation over the rules

Notices for a dress code policy at Hazelton Secondary School (HSS) are no more.

CBC News is reporting that HSS have withdrawn notices the school previously issued in May regarding guidelines around dressing at school.

The notice, printed on yellow paper, contains images of men and women with arrows pointing to various parts of bodies and text accompanying it explaining what clothes students are not allowed to wear.

READ NOW: https://www.interior-news.com/news/new-hazelton-secondary-school-dress-code-sparks-controversy/

In a May 30 interview with the Interior News, Anissa Watson said she had some problems with the way the new code was implemented.

“There was no preamble from the school, no consultation with parents, no consultations with students.

My first thought was, ‘Oh, I was at the school yesterday helping out as a volunteer [and] I broke dress code — I wore a tank top.’ It was 27 degrees, you know?”

READ NOW: https://www.interior-news.com/web-poll/school-dress-code-poll/

She added that, beyond the physical limitations of the code, she was bothered by the emphasis it placed on girls ostensibly distracting boys by what they are wearing.

“My daughter was told that she shouldn’t wear something that [will] cause a boy to have to cover his eyes to walk down the hallway, that’s my concern, the dress code isn’t there to teach the students about respect and professionalism,” she said, adding that when her daughter expressed concerns to a male teacher she was told she was being immature.

Superintendent of Schools for SD82 Katherine McIntosh previously told the Interior News that the dress code was an interim measure and that the school looks forward to developing a code with input from students and parents alike.

“Input from all stakeholders is key to any successful policy. Together, the HSS community will design a dress code that has received input and review from all involved,” said McIntosh.

This is a developing story.

More to come.

Just Posted

‘Re-emerging’ artist takes on Harrison’s Ranger Station residency

Painter Ava P. Christl will be the gallery’s newest artist in residence

Kent wastewater plant gets $7,500 grant for improvement study

The district will be looking at modifications to its digester system

Fantasy Farms told to stop holding special events on farmland that go against agricultural rules

The Morans say it might spell the end of their seasonal events like Reapers Haunted Attractions

New event invites Agassiz to meet museum’s resident ghost

The Haunted Museum Tour will take place on Oct. 26 and 30

REAL ESTATE: Homesteading in the Cariboo a reality

Columnist Freddy Marks talks about why so many are looking to a ranch life when it comes to property

VIDEO: Agassiz lights candles in memory of missing, murdered Indigenous women

The Sisters in Spirit vigil took place at the Agassiz United Church

ELECTION 2019: Climate strikes push environment to top of mind for federal leaders

Black Press Media presents a three-part series on three big election issues

ICBC willing to loosen grip on driver claim data, David Eby says

Private insurers say claims record monopoly keeps them out

B.C. principal suspended for failing to help student who reported inappropriate touching

Principal didn’t remove student from the teacher’s class nor call the parents within a reasonable time

Port Moody mayor goes back on unpaid leave during sex assault investigation

Rob Vagramov said he intends to return as mayor in three or four weeks

UBC issues statement after instructor tells students to vote for Liberal Party

University says partisan messaging was not intentional

Cowichan Valley brothers win big in lottery for second time

Playing same numbers net big wins over a three year period

Fatal overdoses down by 33% in B.C., but carfentanil deaths continue to spike

Carfentanil, an illicit drug more powerful than fentanyl, causing more deaths than ever

Most Read