FVRD mosquito control campaign begins

Annual nuisance insect elimination efforts kicked off in late April

The regional district has embarked on its annual mosquito control campaign.

The Fraser Valley Regional District (FVRD) launched its mosquito control program for the 2012 season in late April.

Rising river levels from warmer weather and melting show have triggered the development of mosquito larvae in low-lying areas along the Fraser River.

With above-normal snow packs through most of the province, higher spring runoff volume is expected, which could bring more mosquitoes. The FVRD’s mosquito control contractor, Morrow Bioscience Ltd., has been monitoring, mapping and treating new and known mosquito development sites. This activity will continue until the end of the season, with efforts increasing as river levels rise.

Floodwater sites are treated with a non-toxic bacterial larvicide — which is environmentally friendly — that specifically targets the mosquito in its larval stage before it can fly. The FVRD does not conduct fogging or spraying of chemicals that kill flying adult mosquitoes.

 

Here are some tips on controlling mosquitoes around your property:

• Apply insect repellent containing DEET according to label instructions when outdoors.

• Wear shoes, socks and long-sleeved, light-coloured, loose-fitting shirts and pants when outdoors.

• Avoid mosquito-laden areas at dawn and dusk.

• Install tight-fitting screens on doors and windows.

• Eliminate or regularly change water in saucers under flower pots, in bird baths, old tires, pet dishes, gutters, pool cavers, trampolines, tarps and other areas where rainwater may collect.

• Swimming pools should be properly maintained and chlorinated and wading pools should be emptied and turned over when not in use.

• Use fine mesh to cover rain barrels and containers that cannot be dumped.

 

This season, residents will also have access to instant updates from the FVRD’s mosquito control contractor. To stay informed, follow them on Twitter (@morrowmosquito) or find them on Facebook at facebook.com/morrowmosquito.

For mosquito control inquiries, please call 1-888-733-2333 or email the FVRD at mosquitoes@fvrd.bc.ca. For health related questions, please call 1-888-968-5463 or visit www.fraserhealth.ca.

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