Situation at Sasquatch ‘much more complicated’

Vitally important to make your voice heard, says letter writer

It is vitally important that anyone who values our provincial parks attend the open house at the Ag Hall on Thursday May 29th and make their voices heard.  It may seem like the Seabird Island/Tamihi Logging  proposal to allow a few logging trucks to run through Sasquatch Park is a minor issue and that the trucks will not really impact the public’s enjoyment of the park.  In reality the situation is much more complicated and threatening.

Firstly, now that the provincial government has made park ‘boundary adjustments’ possible there has been a rush to explore possible ‘adjustments’ for pipelines, hydro lines, and such things as a mining road and independent power production. One possible ‘adjustment’, near Oliver B.C., is for a provincial prison. The proposal for the Sasquatch Park ‘adjustment’ may be joined locally by a proposal for Bridal Falls Provincial Park (for Kinder-Morgan pipeline expansion).  Further afield there are some 30 ideas for park boundary adjustments under consideration.   It well may be that future proposals will include mining, and other developments.

Secondly, the current proposal may be small in scale but once the roads are taken out of the park, there is nothing to stop other timber companies from using the same roads to haul many more truckloads through the park.  The Chilliwack Forest District has stated there is much more timber in the area than the current proposal accounts for.  It is important to understand that once the roads are taken out of the park, there is no going back.

Thirdly, this proposal as well as all others, violates the principle that parks should be free of development.  British Columbia is a resource rich province and has made accommodation for that fact. But many years ago, it was recognized that if we did not protect some lands from development, the entire province would be subject to resource extraction. So, lands were set aside for parks and the rest of the province remained open for business.  We must value our parks for their habitat protection, wilderness experiences and places for rest and recuperation.  If we let parks be downgraded for ‘economic reasons’ there is no stopping the process.  We must stand up for our parks.

All this is not to say the proposed logging south of Sasquatch Park should be disallowed.  Another access route can be developed, there are many old logging roads in the area. It may take more money and work to find another route to take the logs out but it will be well worth it.

Hope to see you at the public meeting on the 29th.

Lillian Martin

Just Posted

Risk of ‘deadly avalanches’ leads to warning for B.C.’s south coast

Weak layer of snow on Vancouver Island, Lower Mainland could trigger an avalanche

Another snowfall warning for Lower Mainland

Another 5-10 cm expected for Metro Vancouver, Fraser Valley and Sunshine Coast

Harrison to participate in inter-municipal business licence program

Construction companies and related businesses will be able to work across the Fraser Valley in 2020

Saskia and Darrel kick off spring tour with Chilliwack concert

Stories of the Great Plains delivered in Gaelic, French and more

RCMP officer reaching out to youth about intimate partner violence

Chilliwack officer and friends of Maple Batalia team up to encourage bystanders to speak up

VIDEO: Wheelchairs teach Agassiz students acceptance through sport

Teacher Donna Gallamore brought wheelchairs to the Kent Elementary for learning and fun

B.C. Speaker Darryl Plecas resumes battle with suspended staff

Committee meets at B.C. legislature to consider new allegations

North BC broken axle derailment could happen again: TSB

CN coal train derailment caused by broken axle can happen again without a different way to inspect

Former B.C. fire chief sues his city after termination

Keith Green’s civil claim says that he believes he was wrongfully terminated

B.C. man injured in police shooting now in wheelchair

“Shots were fired by police and the Kelowna man was transported to the hospital with serious injuries.”

Peter Tork, Monkees’ lovable bass-guitar player, dies at 77

Tork, Micky Dolenz, David Jones and Michael Nesmith formed the made-for-television rock band

From a drunk judge to Clifford Olson: George Garrett recounts a life in B.C. news radio

New book from ‘Intrepid Reporter’ George Garrett offers readers a glimpse behind the headlines

Wife remembers B.C. man killed in possible case of mistaken identity

Rex Gill was in Kamloops working to support his family after oilfield job dried up

Millennial men least likely to have a family doctor: Statistics Canada

Report found more women have primary care physicians, compared with men

Most Read