Former BC Hockey League player thinks NHL in Seattle ‘is going to be huge’

Former BC Hockey League player thinks NHL in Seattle ‘is going to be huge’

Seattle resident Kris Wilson excited at expansion team coming to his hometown

Last spring, a season-ticket drive in Seattle – intended to gauge interest in a potential NHL expansion team – saw fans in the Emerald City commit to more than 30,000 tickets in just a few hours.

The response surprised many in the hockey world, even the potential team owners behind the campaign, with one saying at the time that he was “shell-shocked.”

One person who wasn’t surprised was former Surrey Eagles captain Kris Wilson, who grew up in the U.S. city, captained the BC Hockey League team to a Royal Bank Cup championship in 1998 and is still heavily involved in Seattle’s local minor-hockey community.

He couldn’t get tickets during that drive last March – “Didn’t get in there in time,” he laughed – but he’s still confident he’ll find a way to make it to a few games when the NHL’s newest expansion team hits the ice for the 2020/21 season.

A Seattle franchise was officially approved by the NHL’s board of governors at meetings Tuesday.

“It’s really big news today, obviously,” Wilson told Peace Arch News soon after the league made its announcement.

“Being in the hockey community here, there’s been a buzz about (the NHL) for quite a long time. People thought this would happen and were pretty confident that it would after that ticket drive… it was pretty amazing, 32,000 tickets in 2½ hours.

• READ ALSO: Former Surrey Eagles reflect on 20-year anniversary of Royal Bank Cup title

• READ ALSO: Seattle to officially get NHL team

• READ ALSO: Canucks looking to build rivalry with new Seattle hockey team

Some have questioned whether Seattle will be successful as a hockey market, though the city does have a long history with the sport. The Seattle Thunderbirds have been a staple of the Western Hockey League for years, as have the nearby Everett Silvertips. And a century ago – prior to the formation of the NHL – the Seattle Metropolitans became the first U.S. team to win the Stanley Cup, beating the National Hockey Association’s Montreal Canadiens in 1917.

Count Wilson among those who is confident an NHL team won’t just survive in Seattle, but thrive.

“I think it’s going to be huge, I really do. Right now, the game has grown so much already, especially since I was a kid playing in this area, and my uncles, too, who were hockey players back in the ’70s,” he explained.

“The people of Seattle, when they see the game in front of them… they’re going to become huge fans and really embrace the sport. I think it’s really going to take over and really create a new hockey buzz in this area.”

Wilson, 41, played four seasons for the Eagles in the mid-1990s. After graduating from the BCHL, he spent four years playing for NCAA Div. 3 University of Wisconsin Superior.

Since then, he’s also appeared in the movie Miracle – he played U.S. hockey player Phil Verchota in the film about the U.S. national team’s Miracle on Ice win in 1980 – and he is currently the skills co-ordinator for Seattle’s Sno-Kings Minor Hockey Association.

Though he’s already seen the sport grow in the decades he’s been involved, Wilson expects the new NHL team to have the same long-term effect in Seattle that it had in California in the 1990s, when Wayne Gretzky’s arrival saw a massive uptick in local interest in the NHL and hockey in general.

“There’s a lot of great athletes in the Greater Seattle area. You see a lot of football players and a lot of basketball players come out of here – guys drafted in the first rounds (of their sports) in the last 10, 15 years,” said Wilson, lives in nearby Bothell, Wash.

“I think in 15 to 20 years, you’ll see a surge of Seattle hockey players.”

One problem that will hinder the sport’s growth is a lack of ice sheets in the city and surrounding suburbs, he admits.

“Right now, we’re maxed out. Until we get 10 more sheets in the metro area, I don’t think we’ll see that huge boom, but we’ll still see a massive bump in interest – we’re already seeing it. Myself, being involved in minor hockey, I’ve seen it grow two-fold, three-fold already. Now, it’s really going to boom, I think.”

Though he’s excited at the prospect of being able to take his two young sons – aged two and four – to an NHL game in their hometown soon, Wilson said the NHL news has led him to spend a little time reminiscing about his own childhood playing a sport that, at the time, was still considered niche.

Wilson grew up in north Seattle, in a neighbourhood now called Shoreline, and he admits to still fostering a certain level of bewilderment that the new NHL’s team’s proposed practice facility is set to be built just a block or two away from his childhood home.

It’s a feeling he shares with his brother-in-law, Jonas, who grew up in the same neighbourhood and was a youth-league linemate and close friend of Wilson’s growing up. (They married sisters).

“For him and I, when they announced that the practice facility was going to go at Northgate (Mall), that was pretty crazy,” Wilson said. “I called him and he said, ‘Can you believe where we used to ride our bikes, now there’s going to be an NHL practice rink?

“For him and I, it’s pretty sentimental – that’s our neighbourhood.”



sports@peacearchnews.com

Visit us at peacearchnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

BCHLNHLSurrey Eagles

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

The paraglider pilot, while attempting to free himself, dropped 30 feet and sustained serious injuries as Kent-Harrison Search and Rescue members worked quickly to extract him from the trees. They were able to get him to a waiting ambulance at the end of a nearby forest service road. (Contributed Photo/Dave Harder)
Lower Mainland Search and Rescue saves paraglider in treetop rescue

Pilot tried to self-rescue but sustained serious injuries in a 30-foot fall

An original piece of artwork by Rosie Laponder, was stolen along with various art supplies from Julie Ann’s Art and Custom Framing in Chilliwack on Nov. 28, 2020. (Submitted image)
Thieves steal original artwork, art supplies from Chilliwack store

‘It kind of makes you sick to your stomach,’ says store manager

Still from a video surveillance camera of a man alleged to have stolen from several people at knife-point in Chilliwack (Rosedale) early on Nov. 28, 2020. (Facebook)
Violent crime spree involving knife ends in arrest in Chilliwack

RCMP looking for footage that captures violent crime spree in Chilliwack

Hope Secondary School. (Emelie Peacock/Hope Standard)
Update: Fourth COVID-19 exposure at Hope Secondary School confirmed

Hope high school the only school in Fraser Cascade to experience multiple exposures

Abbotsford's Jada Klein
Abbotsford’s Jada Klein releases debut EP

Fresh off FVMA win, Robert Bateman grad’s ‘Always, Forever’ album arrives online

A B.C. Ambulance Service paramedic wearing a face mask to curb the spread of COVID-19 moves a stretcher outside an ambulance at Royal Columbia Hospital, in New Westminster, B.C., on Sunday, November 29, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
B.C. records deadliest weekend of COVID-19 pandemic with 46 deaths; more than 2,300 cases

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry provides COVID-19 update

Fossil finds at Mt. Stephen. (Photo: Sarah Fuller/Parks Canada)
Extreme hiking, time travel and science converge in the Burgess Shale

Climb high in the alpine and trace your family tree back millions of years – to our ocean ancestors

Menno Place. (Google Street View image.)
32 family members respond to Abbotsford care home’s plea for staffing help during COVID-19 outbreak

Menno Home asks for relief workers for food service, laundry and housekeeping

Kettle bells sit aligned in an indoor fitness studio. (PIxabay.com)
1 COVID-19 case at a B.C. fitness studio leads to 104 more infections, 6 school exposures

According to case data released by Fraser Health, one case of the novel coronavirus carries a big impact

Vehicles drive past a display thanking essential workers in Burnaby, B.C. on Sunday, Nov. 29, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Marissa Tiel
B.C. changing COVID-19 case reporting as virus spread continues

Manual counting takes more time, leads to errors

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good
Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Black Press Media and BraveFace have come together to support children facing life-threatening conditions. Net proceeds from these washable, reusable, three-layer masks go to Make-A-Wish Foundation BC & Yukon.
Put on a BraveFace: Mask fundraiser helps make children’s wishes come true

From Black Press Media + BraveFace – adult, youth and kid masks support Make-A-Wish Foundation

Christy Jordan-Fenton is the co-author of the book Fatty Legs, which has been mentioned amid the controversy of an Abbotsford school assignment on residential schools.
Co-author of residential schools book condemns controversial Abbotsford class assignment

Children’s book mentioned amid controversy at W. A. Fraser Middle School

Most Read